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Maybe it’s a phone on a bus, or a tablet in a store or the laptop on your coffee table. Maybe you’re wearing it on your wrist or over your eyes. Whatever it is, it knows who you are, where you are and the best way to reach you at any moment. That may seem a little creepy until you consider you bought those devices to get helpful information, and in order to help you, they need to know the who-where-when-why of what you’re all about. Of course, marketers want that info, too. In the parlance of Melissa Parrish , this makes you “addressable,” and it’s transforming the very nature of marketing. About half of US online adults are now “always addressable,” she says, and the number is rising oh-so rapidly. Read full story… Follow us on Twitter Join free newsletter View upcoming events Find a new job

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5 Minutes with Forrester’s Melissa Parrish

Matthew Setter has started off a series of posts on the SitePoint PHP blog with the first post interviewing community members to answer one main question, “can great apps be written in PHP?” I read an old post, circa 2010, on the MailChimp blog a little while ago, about their experience using PHP. It struck a chord with me, because the sentiments they shared I’ve felt myself, and heard echoed many times over the years. Despite its successes, or people’s successes with it (a la Facebook, MailChimp, Hailo, Google, and others), it’s inferred we should use languages which had their foundations as pure languages; not ones which came to be a language, as PHP evolved into over time. He references some of the other comments in the Mailchimp article about their experience with the language along with mentions of a few others . He wonders if these negative comments are true and, to get some answers, searches out other developers and their opinions. In this first interview he talks with Bobby Deveaux about his background in the language, what he’d like to see added and more. Link: http://www.

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SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Great Apps Be Written in PHP – An Interview Series

The NetTuts.com Code blog has posted the second part of their series showing how to use the New Relic monitoring service in various kinds of web applications. In the previous article they looked at using it in a Ruby application, but in this new post it’s all about PHP. Today, we will look at how to monitor a PHP application using New Relic. More specifically, we will set up a basic WordPress installation and get some performance data about it, in the New Relic dashboards. With the PHP version of the agent, the environment is a lot more important, as the agent is installed and lives on the box where the application will be deployed, rather than being part of any particular app. They use an EC2 instance for their example, but the steps can be applied on other systems. They help you get the needed software installed, validate they’re correctly configured and do a basic setup of WordPress. Next up is the steps to…

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NetTuts.com: How to Use New Relic With PHP & WordPress

On the InfoTuts.com site they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to make a “Log in with Google” button for your application and make it work with a little PHP magic on the backend. So you want to allow users to login into your website using their gmail credentials? You have seen various websites that allow their users to login in their websites using gmail, facebook, linked in, Microsoft, git hub credentials. It’s time to integrate it in your website. We will cover all the login system in our posts one by one and this one is dedicated to create Google Plus login for your website with PHP using OAuth2 . Google offers many APIs like Google Maps, translate API, Analytics ApI etc. Today we will use its Google Plus API so lets proceed with our tutorial. They break the process down into about five steps: Login to Google API Console. Go to APIs and you will have to turn on Google Plus API. Go to APIs and Auth and then under credentials tab. …

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InfoTuts.com: Create Login With Google Plus in Your Website With PHP

The Zumba Engineering blog has a new post looking at a way you can control code quality and standards with the help of Composer, git hooks and the PHP Code Sniffer (phpcs) tools. Maintaining code quality on projects where there are many developers contributing is a tough assignment. How many times have you tried to contribute to an open-source project only to find the maintainer rejecting your pull request on the grounds of some invisible coding standard? Luckily there are tools that can assist maintainers. In this post, I’ll be going over how to use composer , git hooks , and phpcs to enforce code quality rules. These three technologies are combined together to make a more seamless experience for the developer while keeping the code quality high. Their method makes use of the “scripts” (post-install-cmd) feature of Composer to, after the installation of all packages, set up a git hook script that will run the phpcs checks on pre-commit. It’s a pretty simple shell script that kicks back

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Zumba Engineering Blog: Enforce code standards with composer, git hooks, and phpcs

You may think it’s an oxymoron, but Gartner say it is possible to have a smart government. The temptation to be facetious is pretty strong here, but after initial skepticism, we found that what Gartner was talking about is 10 different technologies that can make government more efficient . Smart governments, Gartner says, are governments that integrate information, communication and operational technologies across multiple domains, process areas and jurisdictions to generate “sustainable public value.” By using these emerging technologies, which were identified at the recent Gartner Sumposium/ITxpo in Dubai, the taxpayers should get some bigger bangs for their bucks. Read full story… Follow us on Twitter Join free newsletter View upcoming events Find a new job

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Gartner’s 10 Technologies That Make Government Smarter